(15/10/2018) Freo's urban forest is growing | City of Fremantle

News & Media

15 October 2018
(15/10/2018) Freo's urban forest is growing

More than 1800 trees have been planted over the past 12 months as part of the plan to create an urban forest in Fremantle.

In the 2017-18 financial year a total of 714 trees were planted by the City of Fremantle on residential verges and in local parks, while another 92 were added as part of the landscaping component of City projects like pocket parks, car parks and walkways.

This follows the planting of 500 verge and park trees in the previous year, and is the result of the doubling of the City’s tree-planting budget from $60,000 to $120,000.

In addition, the City also planted 12,000 plants - including 1015 trees - in dunes, bushland and the river foreshore during nine community planting days and 21 volunteer planting days with conservation volunteers and local schools.

City of Fremantle Parks and Landscapes manager Ryan Abbott said it was all part of the plan to grow the urban forest in Fremantle.

“The City’s Urban Forest Plan forms part of our Greening Fremantle: Strategy 2020, which aims to progressively increase tree planting across the City to achieve at least 20 per cent canopy coverage,” Mr Abbott said.

“An assessment last year showed our canopy coverage was around 13 per cent, so to hit the 20 per cent target we have an ongoing tree planting and revegetation program and are integrating new trees into road and path upgrades wherever we can.

“For this current financial year we’re looking to continue to expand our tree-planting program and plant another thousand trees across Fremantle.”

The suburb of Samson had the highest tree planting numbers in 2017/18 due to the City’s targeted Greening Samson project.

Mapping undertaken for the Urban Forest Plan identified Samson had some of the lowest canopy coverage in Fremantle, which meant Samson was on average two degrees hotter than nearby suburbs due to the urban heat island effect.

A total of 212 trees were planted in Samson alone, while another 299 were planted in Beaconsfield, Hilton and Fremantle, and 203 in South Fremantle, North Fremantle, White Gum Valley and O’Connor.

The species of trees planted included red flowering gums, bottlebrushes, jacarandas and tuart trees, with the varieties carefully chosen to best suit the local conditions and surroundings.

As well as reducing the urban heat island effect by providing more shade, trees also absorb carbon dioxide, filter air pollutants and provide a natural cooling effect by releasing moisture through their leaves.

Planting more trees also helps to connect regional bushland to the coast and provides habitat and food for native animals.

For more information visit the Urban Forest Plan page on the City of Fremantle website.